My Deep Sky Observations with my Electronic Telescopes (Complete List of Observed DSO)

List of Observed Sky Objects | Remarks | References

On this page, I collected all the sky objects that I visited with my electronic telescopes eVscope*, eVscope 2*, Vespera, and Vespera Pro.
*) No longer in my possession.

Note: See also

The linked object numbers lead to the detail pages for the respective objects; these typically contain at least one photo from each observation sesssion as well as further information about the object.

 

List of Observed Sky Objects

Object details can be obtained using the links to the relevant deep sky objects. Smaller sky objects that are also included in photos are usually not listed on their own.

Note: Except for corrections, the eVscope and eVscope 2 columns are closed.

DSO Details
Name, Companions Constellation Type eVscope eVscope 2 Vespera Vesp. Pro Remarks
B 33 Horse Head Nebula Orion DN   Always a challenge; more details with longer exposure times
B 142/43 Triple Cave Nebula, E Nebula Aquila DN       Difficult to recognize
C/2017 T2 C/2017 T2 (Panstarrs) --- C       The comet can be recognized as such
C/2019 Y4 C/2019 Y4 (Atlas) --- C       The comet can be recognized as such
C/2020 F3 NEOWISE --- C       A nice comet, but too late in the year for better photos...
C/2022 E3 C/2022 E3 (ZTF)   C       Central part visible, became longer with longer exposure (the comet moves differently than the stars)
C 9 Cave Nebula Cepheus GN       Large reddish nebula, faint in the eVs
Cr 350   Ophiuchus OC       Very large and sparse star cluster; it is not concentrated and not well separated from its background; too large for the eVs(2).
Cr 399 Coat Hanger Vulpecula OC       In binoculars better to see than in a telescope
IC 10   Cassiopeia G       Irregular dwarf galaxy
IC 405 Flaming Star Nebula Auriga GN   Practically nothing to see with eVs(2), but with the Vsp you can see it (see also IC 410)
IC 410 Tadpole Nebula Auriga GN       IC 405 (on top) and IC 410 (at the bottom) can be observed together in the mosaic mode of Vespera; IC 410 can be observed together with M 36, IC 417, and NGC 1931 in a Vespera mosaic.
IC 417 Spider Nebula, with NGC 1931, M 36 und IC 410 Auriga GE       Emission nebula with embedded open star cluster; with NGC 1931, M 36, and IC 410 in a Vespera mosaic
IC 443 Jellyfish Nebula Gemini SR       Reddish nebula, supernova remnant
IC 447 Dreyer's Nebula Monoceros GR       Reflection nebula not far from the Christmas Tree Cluster/Cone Nebula NGC 2264 (mosaic section)
IC 1276   Serpens GC       Appears with a reddish tint because of its large distance and the dust of the Milky Way.
IC 1396 Elephant Trunk Cepheus GNE   Practically not visible as a nebula with the eVs(2), but with the Vsp
IC 1613   Cetus G       Irregular dwarf galaxy, practically not seen...
IC 1795 Fish Head Nebula Cassiopeia GN     The galactic nebulae IC 1795 (also named NGC 896), IC 1805, and IC 1848 form a larger nebulosity region in the constellation Cassiopeia, not far away from the Perseus Double Cluster NGC 869/884. The Fish Head Nebula next to IC 1805 is the brightest region and was therefore discovered first.
IC 1805 Heart Nebula Cassiopeia GN/OS   The galactic nebulae IC 1805, IC 1848, and IC 1795 (also named NGC 896) form a larger nebulosity region in the constellation Cassiopeia, not far away from the Perseus Double Cluster NGC 869/884.
IC 1848 Soul Nebula Cassiopeia GN/OS   The galactic nebulae IC 1848, IC 1805, and IC 1795 (also named NGC 896) form a larger nebulosity region in the constellation Cassiopeia, not far away from the Perseus Double Cluster NGC 869/884.
IC 2118 Witch Head Nebula Eridanus GN       Not really recognizable. But with denoising a little bit better...
IC 2177 Seagull Nebula Monoceros GN     eVs(2): Not much to see. Vsp: Together with M 50 (mosaic) and alone
IC 2574   Ursa Major G       Very faint spiral galaxy, hard for the eVs
IC 4593 White Eyed Pea Nebula Hercules PN       Is turquoise and has a bright core, which cannot be recognized in the eVs.
IC 4634 Rose Nebula Ophiuchus PN       Has a point-symmetric, s-shaped structure, but is so tiny that none of this can be detected in the eVs; the nebula itself is difficult to find, but in the end, the colour helps.
IC 4665   Ophiuchus OC       Can already be seen with the naked eye as a faint glow; too large to be seen well in the eVs.
IC 4756   Serpens OC       Consists of few, inconspicuously scattered stars and is rather an object for opera glasses or binoculars; for the eVs(2) too large.
IC 5070 Pelican Nebula Cygnus GNE   Large reddish nebula, can be guessed without post-processing... Visible in Vespera
IC 5146 Cocoon Nebula Cygnus GNE   Small reddish nebula with embedded open star cluster Cr 470
M 1 Crab Nebula Taurus GE/SR   More distinct with longer exposure times; supernova remnant
M 2   Aquarius GC   Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 3   Canes Venatici GC   Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 4   Scorpius GC       From Central Europe the most resolvable globular cluster, but difficult to observe because it is located far south.
M 5   Serpens Cauda GC   Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones, larger than M 3
M 6   Scorpius OC       Forms a cluster duo with M 7, but not in the eVs(2)...
M 7   Scorpius OC       Forms a cluster duo with M 6, but not in the eVs(2)... Regrettably only photographed "disturbed" up to now...
M 8 Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius GN       Emission nebula (NGC 6523) and open star cluster (NGC 6530)
M 9   Ophiuchus GC       Small globular star cluster
M 10   Ophiuchus GC     Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 12
M 11 Wild Duck Cluster Scutum OC   Is located in the Scutum cloud, a special section of the Milky Way; therefore, the photos are full of stars.
M 12   Ophiuchus GC     Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 10
M 13   Hercules GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5 and M 92
M 14   Ophiuchus GC     The third of the three bright globular star clusters in Ophiuchus, but different in character from M 10 und M 12.
M 15   Pegasus GC   Supposedly, it is the best globular cluster in autumn, bright core.
M 16 Eagle Nebula Serpens GN   Star cluster M 16 embedded in the Eagle Nebula IC 4703
M 17 Omega/Swan Nebula Sagittarius GN   One of the most beautiful emission nebulae; in the reversing telescope, some people recognize a swan...
M 18   Sagittarius OC       More a less a "sub par" star cluster
M 19   Ophiuchus GC       Famous for its oval shape
M 20 Trifid Nebula Sagittarius GN       Is called Trifid Nebula because it consists of three parts.
M 21   Sagittarius OC       Open star cluster that is paid little attention to
M 22   Sagittarius GC       Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 23   Sagittarius OC       Large open star cluster (nearly moon size)
M 24 Small Sagittarius Cloud Sagittarius SC       Part of the Milky Way, too large for the eVs(2)
M 25   Sagittarius OC       More of a "classical object for binoculars"
M 26   Scutum OC     One of the more inconspicuous star clusters
M 27 Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula GN   For me, one of the most beautiful nebulae
M 28   Sagittarius GC       Smaller than the nearby M 22
M 29   Cygnus OC   Pattern created from only a few stars
M 30   Capricornus GC     According to Stoyan, a typical globular star cluster that cannot be resolved in small telescopes. In the eVs(2) this is manifested by the very bright core.
M 31 Andromeda Galaxy Andromeda G   Too large for the eVs(2) FoV
M 32   Andromeda G   Satellite galaxy of M 31
M 33 Triangulum Galaxy Triangulum G   Very faint; eVs(2): details recognizable only after longer duration in EV mode
M 34   Perseus OC   Large and nice open star cluster, reminds me of M 41
M 35 Together with NGC 2158, IC 2156/57 (Vsp) Gemini OC   Large and nice open star cluster; Vsp: together with NGC 2158 and also with IC 2156/2157 (all of them open star clusters)
M 36   Auriga OC   Nice open star cluster, smaller than M 35
M 37   Auriga OC   Nice, very dense open star cluster
M 38   Auriga OC   Nice open star cluster, larger than M 36, not as dense as M 37
M 39   Cygnus OC     Few stars
M 40 Winnecke 4 Ursa Major DS       Optical double star; nearby are three small galaxies (NGC 4284, NGC 4290, PGC 39934)
M 41   Canis Major OC     Large and nice open star cluster, reminds me of M 34; not as dense as M 35-38
M 42 Orion Nebula Orion GE   Too large, somewhat blurry, Trapezium mostly washed out with eVs(2); better with the Vsp
M 43 De Mairan's Nebula Orion GE   Part of M 42 (the "head")
M 44 Beehive, Praesepe Cancer OC     Too large for the eVs' FoV, a few bright stars; possible as a Vespera mosaic
M 45 Pleiades, Seven Sisters Taurus OC   Too large for the eVs' FoV; Vsp: as a mosaic and with nebulae NGC 1432 and NGC 1435 (and others)
M 46 with NGC 2438 (PN) Puppis OC     Large; NGC 2438 (PN) on the photo! Vsp: M 46 and M 47 in the same FoV (mosaic)
M 47   Puppis OC     Large, contains some large bright stars; Vsp: M 47 and M 46 in the same FoV (mosaic)
M 48   Hydra OC     Large, many bright stars, at the center many nearby stars...
M 49 with NGC 4470 (part of Arp 134) Virgo G       Elliptical galaxy with several small galaxies in the field of view
M 50   Monoceros OC   Nice large open star cluster with many fine and some bright starsVsp: alone and together with IC 2177 in a mosaic
M 51 Whirlpool Galaxy, with NGC 5195 Canes Venatici G Nice spiral galaxy with connected satellite galaxy NGC 5195; somewhat small in the Vsp, better again in the Vsp Pro
M 52   Cassiopeia OC   Medium-sized open star cluster; together with NGC 7635 in the Vsp
M 53  

Coma Berenices

GC     One of the smaller globular star clusters; in the Vespera Pro together with NGC 5053 on the photo
M 54   Sagittarius KS       The left one of the three globular star clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69. According to Stoyan, it is not a globular star cluster of our galaxy, but belongs to a dwarf galaxy, which is just being "cannibalized" by our galaxy.
M 55     KS       Larger globular star cluster, very far in the south
M 56   Lyra GC   One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 57 Ring Nebula Lyra PN   Ring clearly visible; tiny with Vsp
M 58   Virgo G     Barred spiral galaxy, but hard to see in the eVs; on a Vespera mosaic together with M 87, M 89, and M 90
M 59 with M 60 if at the edge Virgo G       Elliptical galaxy, smaller than M 58; at a distance of 0.4° from M 60 (can be seen together with M 60 with a suitable section)
M 60 with NGC 4647, NGC 4638/37; with M 59 if at the edge Virgo G       Elliptical galaxy with satellite NGC 4647 (spiral galaxy); galaxies NGC 4638/37 and IC 809 also on some of the photos (and M 59 with a suitable section)
M 61   Virgo G       Spiral galaxy, small and fine spiral in the eVscope; on May 6, 2020, the new supernova SN 2020jfo within it was discovered.
M 62   Ophiuchus GC       Is located near the horizon, therefore hard to observe
M 63 Sunflower Galaxy Canes Venatici G     Nice, elongated spiral galaxy, somewhat larger
M 64 Black Eye Galaxy Coma Berenices G     Impressive spiral galaxy with unique look, somewhat larger
M 65 with M 66 Leo G   Thin, elongated spiral galaxy, spiral hard to see; part of the Leo triplet (with M 66 and NGC 3628); with M 66 in the eVs' rectangular FoV; with Vesp the whole triplet can be observed
M 66 with M 65 Leo G   Elongated spiral galaxy, spiral visible; part of the Leo triplet (with M 65 and NGC 3628); with M 65 in the eVs' rectangular FoV; with Vesp the whole triplet csn be observed
M 67   Cancer OC     Large, nice cluster with a few bright stars and many not so bright ones
M 69   Sagittarius GC       Is located farthest to the West of the three globular clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69, small.
M 70   Sagittarius GC       Is located in the middle one of the three globular clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69, small. Up to now, only photographed "disturbed".

M 71

  Sagitta GC   According to Stoyan, an unusually loose globular star cluster.
M 72   Aquarius GC      

According to Stoyan, one of the more inconspicuous globular star clusters

M 73   Aquarius OC       According to Stoyan, one of the more obscure Messier objects, but worth visiting
M 74   Pisces G   Nice spiral galaxy, but in the eVs(2) small.
M 75   Sagittarius GC       According to Stoyan, following M 54, the farthest away globular star cluster in Messier's catalogue, which explains its low brightness and size.
M 76 Small Dumbbell Nebula Perseus PN     Small, colorful, rectangular
M 77   Cetus G   Spiral galaxy, a bit more to see than with M 74, but in the end just a soft dot in the eVs
M 78   Orion GE   Faint, but identifiable using two stars; I was able to see more details with a dark sky
M 79   Lepus GC       Smaller globular star cluster
M 80   Scorpius GC       One of the fainter globular clusters, but nevertheless worthwhile; located almost as southernly as M 4.
M 81 Bode Galaxy; with NGC 3077 (Vsp) Ursa Major G Nice spiral galaxy; the spiral is not very conspicuous in the eVs; can be seen together with NGC 3077 or M 82 in the Vsp
M 82 Cigar Galaxy Ursa Major G Elongated irregular galaxy (cigar), dirsturbed by an encounter with M 81; can be seen together with M 81 in the Vsp
M 84 with M 86, NGC 4402, NGC 4387 Virgo G Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with M 86 in the eVs' FoV (+ NGC 4387 and a bit of NGC 4402); forms together with M 86 and NGC 4387 the "Great Galactic Face" (the latter is best accessed via NGC 4387).
M 85 with NGC 4394 and supernova 2020nlb Coma Berenices G       Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with the galaxy NGC 4394 (barred spiral) in the eVs' FoV; the new supernova 2020nlb (discovered on June 25, 2020) can be seen well.
M 86 with M 84, NGC 4402, NGC 4387 Virgo G Observed alone and together with M 84 in the eVs' FoV (+ NGC 4387 and a bit of NGC 4402); forms together with M 84 and NGC 4387 the "Great Galactic Face."
M 87 with NGC 4478 and sometimes NGC 4476; with jet stream Virgo G   Elliptical galaxy, seen together with NGC 4478 in the eVs' FoV - and in the rectangular format also NGC 4476; has a jet stream; center of the Virgo galaxy cluster; on a Vespera mosaic together with M 58, M 89, and M 90
M 88   Coma Berenices G     Spiral galaxy, spiral can be recognized on the eVscope photos
M 89   Virgo G     Elliptical galaxy, a small bright and fuzzy dot; on a Vespera mosaic together with M 58, M 87, and M 90
M 90   Virgo G     Spiral galaxy, spiral can be recognized; on a Vespera mosaic together with M 58, M 87, and M 89
M 91   Coma Berenices G       Barred spiral galaxy, bar can be recognized, spiral not so much...
M 92   Hercules GC Nice globular star cluster, smaller than M 13, but brighter core
M 93   Puppis OC       Nice open star cluster with a compact center
M 94   Canes Venatici G       Small spiral galaxy; the spiral appears more like a nebula
M 95   Leo G Small barred spiral galaxy, relatively faint, but the bar is visible. Forms a pair with M 96, but too far away for the eVs (40'). M 96 and M 105 can be included in the mosaic mode of Vsp.
M 96   Leo G Spiral galaxy, forms a pair with M 95, but too far away for the eVs (40'). M 95 and M 105 can be included in the mosaic mode of Vsp.
M 97 Owl Nebula; together with M 108 in the Vsp (Pro) Ursa Major PN Small green dot with two dark spots; Vsp (Pro): Together with M 108 on the same photo
M 98   Coma Berenices G       Spiral galaxy seen edge-on, small bright core
M 99 Coma Pinwheel Galaxy Coma Berenices G     Spiral galaxy, almost seen face-on, similar to M 100 and M 101, but much smaller than M 101; discovered more galaxies on a mosaic!
M 100   Coma Berenices G     Spiral galaxy, almost seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 101, but much smaller than M 101; discovered more galaxies on a photo/mosaic!
M 101 Pinwheel Galaxy Ursa Major G Spiral galaxy, seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 100, but much larger than both; quite impressive in the eVs(2) and Vsp; in Vespera also seen with dwarf galaxy NGC 5474.
M 102 Spindle Galaxy Draco G     Seen edge-on; shares the name "Spindle Galaxy" with two other galaxies
M 103   Casiopeia OC   Open star cluster with many fine stars; the brighter stars form a triangle
M 104 Sombrero Galaxy Virgo G     Spiral galaxy, seen nearly edge-on; the dust ring and the bright nucleus led to the name; very impressive in the eVs.
M 105 together with NGC 3384/89 Leo G Bright elliptical galaxy; can be seen together with the galaxies NGC 3384 (elliptical) and the smaller NGC 3389 (spiral) in the eVs' FoV. In the Vespera (Pro) mosaic additionally together with M 95 and M 96.
M 106 with NGC 4248 Canes Venatici G   Larger and bright spiral galaxy with bright core; close to it there is the small spiral galaxy NGC 4248.
M 107   Ophiuchus GC       According to Stoyan, the faintest of the Messier globular star clusters in constellation Ophiuchus
M 108 together with M 97 in the Vsp (Pro) Ursa Major G   Barred spiral galaxy, nearly seen edge-on; Vsp (Pro): can be seen together with M 97
M 109   Ursa Major G     Barred spiral galaxy, the bar is easily recognized in the eVs
M 110 near M 31 Andromeda G     Satellite galaxy of M 31, very faint...
Mel 25 Hyades Taurus OC       Too large even for the Vespera's mosaic mode
NGC 40 Bow Tie Nebula Cepheus PN     Violet dot with white central star
NGC 147 Together with NGC 185 (Vesp) Cassiopeia G       Elliptical dwarf galaxy; forms a gravitationally connected galaxy pair with NGC 185
NGC 185 Together with NGC 147 (Vesp) Cassiopeia G     Elliptical dwarf galaxy; forms a gravitationally connected galaxy pair with NGC 147
NGC 281 Pacman Nebula Cassiopeia GE   Reddish nebula, fits the eVs' FoV; with embedded star cluster IC 1590
NGC 404 Mirach's Ghost Andromeda G       Galaxy close to Mirach, therefore called Mirach's Ghost
NGC 410   Pisces G       Elliptical galaxy, has extended areas where stars are formed.
NGC 457 Owl/E.T. Cluster Cassiopeia OC   Nice, particularly the eyes
NGC 514 With supernova 2020uxz Pisces G       Barred spiral galaxy, supernova a small dot
NGC 559   Cassiopeia OC       Smaller open cluster in Cassiopeia
NGC 604 Inside M 33 Triangulum HII   The brightest H II region in M 33, a small blob...
NGC 654   Cassiopeia OC       Together with NGC 659, NGC 663, and M 103 in the Vsp's FoV
NGC 659   Cassiopeia OC       Together with NGC 654, NGC 663, and M 103 in the Vsp's FoV
NGC 660   Pisces G       Spiral galaxy; one of the few polar ring galaxies, which are created from the fusioning of two galaxies
NGC 663   Cassiopeia OC   Large; Vsp: Together with NGC 654, NGC 659, and M 103 in the Vsp's FoV; the largest of these clusters
NGC 672 with IC 1727 (together Holm 46) Triangulum G       Galaxy pair Holm 46
NGC 752   Andromeda OC   Large, loose open star cluster (in the Vespera also as a mosaic)
NGC 869 h Persei, part of the Perseus Double Cluster Perseus OC   Both clusters together are too large for the eVscope's field of view; the more compact cluster of the two; Vesp: nice, both clusters fit the Vsp's FoV
NGC 884 chi Persei, part of the Perseus Double Cluster Perseus OC   Both clusters together are too large for the eVs' FoV; for me, this is the nicer cluster; Vesp: nice, both clusters fit the Vsp's FoV
NGC 891   Andromeda G   Seen from the side; nice but faint
NGC 925   Triangulum G       Very faint in the eVs
NGC 1023   Perseus G       Elliptical galaxy; the brightest member of a group of galaxies, which includes NGC 891 (Andromeda)
NGC 1432 Maia Nebula, within M 45 Taurus GR       Reflection nebula within M 45, illuminated by the star Maia
NGC 1435 Merope Nebula, within M 45 Taurus GR       Reflection nebula within M 45, illuminated by the star Merope
NGC 1499 California Nebula Perseus GN     eVs(2): Nothing or little to see... Vsp: Red nebula that I saw with the Vsp for the first time (mosaic).
NGC 1502 Golden Harp Cluster, Kemble's Cascade Camelopardis OC/A       Kemble's Cascade ends on one side with the open star cluster NGC 1502 (Golden Harp Cluster).
NGC 1514 Crystal Ball Taurus PN       Planetary nebula, appears greenish with a white central star.
NGC 1788 Cosmic Bat Nebula Orion GR       Rather faint, according to Stoyan
NGC 1931 With NGC 417, M 36, and IC 410 Auriga GE/R       Emission/reflection nebula; with IC 417, M 36, and IC 410 in a Vespera mosaic
NGC 1977 Running Man Nebula Orion GR   The Running Man Nebula includes the reflection nebulae NGC 1977, 1973, and 1975 as well as the open star cluster NGC 1981; a dark nebula has the shape of a running man
NGC 1980 Lost Jewel of Orion Orion OC     Quite nice, below M 42/43...
NGC 1981 Coal Car Cluster Orion OC       Open star cluster above the Running Man Nebula; together with M 42/43, NGC 1977, and NGC 1980 in a Vsp mosaic.
NGC 2023   Orion GE/R       Close to the Horsehead Nebula B 33 (emission and reflection nebula)
NGC 2024 Flame Nebula Orion GE   Rather faint reddish nebula next to Alnitak; not easy for the eVs(2). Better in the Vespera, also together with B 33 in a mosaic.
NGC 2071   Orion GR  

  North of M 78 in Orion
NGC 2141   Orion OC       Nice, but not well known open star cluster in Orion
NGC 2158 Close to M 35 Gemini OC       Close to M 35 and together with it in the Vsp's FoV
NGC 2169 Little Pleiades, 37 Cluster; with NGC 2194 Orion OC+OC       Open star cluster, together with NGC 2194 (Vsp mosaic)
NGC 2174 Monkey Head Nebula; with NGC 2175 Orion GN       Reddish nebula that resembles the head of a monkey; contains the open star cluster 2175
NGC 2194 With NGC 2169 Orion OC       Open star cluster; together with NGC 2169 (Vsp mosaic)
NGC 2244 Open star cluster in Rosette Nebula Monoceros OC   Nice to see; did not find the embedding nebula, the Rosette Nebula, with the eVs(2), but found it with the Vsp (mosaic).
NGC 2261 Hubble's Variable Nebula Monoceros GR     Nebula that looks like a comet (with NGC 2264)
NGC 2264 Christmas Tree Cluster/Conus Nebula Monoceros OC   eVs(2): Saw only the star cluster. Conus nebula visible with Vespera (plus NGC 2261)
NGC 2359 Thor's Helmet Canis Major GN       According to Stoyan a good example of the usefulness of nebula filters
NGC 2392 Eskimo Nebula Gemini PN     Round light blue spot with white dot in it
NGC 2403   Camelopardis G     Spiral galaxy that is regarded as one of the best galaxies for small telescopes; unclear why Messier overlooked it; fairly impressive in the eVs.
NGC 2419 Intergalactic Wanderer Lynx GC     Small, still in the Milky Way...
NGC 2438 Inside M 46 Puppis PN     Planetary nebula inside of M 46 (there I found it...); can also be found on the Vsp mosaic (very small)
NGC 2683   Lynx G       Spiral galaxy, seen edge-on.
NGC 2775   Cancer G       Small spiral galaxy with bright core; spiral not recognizable in the eVs
NGC 2805 Part of galaxy quartet Holm 124 Ursa Major G       Said to be a double star ... but is a spiral galaxy in SkySafari; forms together with NGC 2814, NGC 2820, and IC 2458 the interactive galaxy quartet Holm 124.
NGC 2903   Leo G     One of the brighter spiral galaxies; unclear why Messier missed it...
NGC 3077   Ursa Major G     Small companion of M 81
NGC 3115   Sextans G       Elliptical galaxy, one of the "spindle galaxies"...
NGC 3184 with NGC 3179, NGC 3180, NGC 3181 Ursa Major G       NGC 3184 is a barred spiral, NGC 3180 and NGC 3181 are H II regions in NGC 3184 (too small for theVscope); NGC 3179 is a lenticular galaxy.
NGC 3190 Hickson 44, Leo Quartet, Arp 316 Leo G       The galaxy NGC 3190 belongs, together with NGC 3185, NGC 3187, and NGC 3193 to the compact galaxy group Hickson 44, also called Leo Quartet.
NGC 3227/26 Arp 94 or Holm 187 Leo G       The barred spiral NGC 3227 forms a double galaxy with NGC 3226 (Arp 94 or Holm 187)
NGC 3344   Leo G       Small spiral galaxy, spiral recognizable in the eVs, bright stars in the area of the galaxy
NGC 3384/89 See M 105 Leo G   The galaxy NGC 3384 (elliptical) and the smaller NGC 3389 (spiral) can be seen together with the galaxy M 105 in the eVs' FoV. In the Vespera (Pro)'s mosaic mode, M 95 and M 96 can also be included.
NGC 3607/08/05 Galaxy triple Holm 240 Leo G       Three elliptical galaxies (Holm 240), which can all be seen in the eVs' FoV (size: 3607 > 3608 > 3605)
NGC 3628 Part of Leo Triplet (Arp 317, Holm 246) Leo G Spiral galaxy seen edge-on; it forms a conspicuous group with M 65 and M 66, the Leo Triplet (Arp 317, Holm 246).
NGC 3842 Abell 1637, Leo Cluster Leo G       Part of and target for Abell 1637 (Leo Cluster), a large galaxy cluster
NGC 3877   Ursa Major G       Spiral galaxy, nearly seen edge-on
NGC 4085/88   Ursa Major G       The elliptical galaxy NGC 4085 and the spiral galaxy NGC 4088 seem to interact with one another. At least, the deformations of galaxy NGC 4088 seem to indicate this. Both galaxies can be easily observed in the eVs' FoV.
NGC 4216/06/22   Canes Venatici G      

NGC 4216 is the largest of three galaxies (NGC 4216, NGC 4206, and NGC 4222), are all in the eVs' FoV.

NGC 4236   Draco G       Spiral galaxy; very faint
NGC 4244 Silver Needle Galaxy Canes Venatici G       Spiral galaxy, very thin and long, seen edge-on
NGC 4248 See M 106 Canes Venatici G       Small spiral galaxy in the vicinity of M 106
NGC 4284/4290 See M 40 Ursa Major G       Two small galaxies in the vicinity of the optical double star M 40
NGC 4298/4302 Holm 377 or KPG 332 Coma Berenices G     The spiral galaxies NGC 4298 and NGC 4302 form an interacting pair (Holm 377 or KPG 332). In a Vespera mosaic together with M 99 and M 100 and many small galaxies.
NGC 4387/88/4402 Great Galactic Face; see also M 84/86 Virgo G Three small galaxies close to M 84 and M 86; more or less in the eVs' FoV. NGC 4387 is a small elliptical galaxy and the nose of the "Great Galatical Face"; NGC 4388 is a spiral galaxy, and forms the mouth; NGC 4402 is a spiral galaxy on top of the GGF. In a Vespera (Pro) mosaic you can see the whole GGF and the whole Markarian's chain.
NGC 4394 See M 85 Coma Berenices G       Small spiral galaxy close to M 85 (in the eVs' FoV)
NGC 4435/38 The Eyes; with and without NGC 4461/58 Virgo G NGC 4435 is a lenticular galaxy and interacts with the lenticular galaxy NGC 4438, that is about 100,000 light years more distant. When "the Eyes" are moved towards the bottom right, you can also see the galaxies NGC 4461 (lenticular) and NGC 4458 (elliptical) in eVs' FoV, as is the case here. In a Vespera (Pro) mosaic, "the Eyes" are part of Markarian's chain.
NGC 4449 Rectangle Galaxy Canes Venatici G       Irregular galaxy
NGC 4458/61 Markarian's Chain Virgo G The galaxies NGC 4461 (lenticular) und NGC 4458 (elliptical) in constellation Virgo are members of Markarian's chain and interact with one another. If the galaxies are moved towards the top left of the FoV, you can also see the lenticular galaxies NGC 4438 and NGC 4435 (The Eyes) in the eVs' FoV. In a Vespera (Pro) mosaic, the whole Markarian's chain can be seen.
NGC 4470 See M 49 Virgo G       Spiral galaxy close to M 49
NGC 4490/85 Cocoon Galaxies Canes Venatici G       Distorted spiral galaxies, which interact with one another; form an interacting pair of galaxies (Arp 269, Holm 414 or KPG 341)
NGC 4559   Coma Berenices G       Spiral galaxy with large regions where new stars are born
NGC 4565 Needle Galaxy Coma Berenices G     One of the most prominent and famous edge-on spiral galaxies in the sky; together with NGC 4562 and NGC 4494, NGC 4565 forms the small galaxy group LGG 294.
NGC 4567/68 Siamese Twins, Butterfly Galaxies Virgo G     NGC 4567/8 are two spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster; they are also called "The Siamese Twins" or "The Butterfly Galaxies".
NGC 4631/27 Whale/Herring Galaxy, with NGC 4627 (Arp 281) Virgo G     Spiral galaxy seen edge-on; above it, there is a compagnion, the elliptical dwarf galaxy NGC 4627. Both form the galaxy pair Arp 281. A little farther apart, there is the barred spiral galaxy NGC 4656/57.
NGC 4636 With Supernova 2020ue nearby Virgo G       Supernova appears as a little dot...
NGC 4638/37 See M 60 Virgo G       Elliptical galaxy NGC 4638 and small partner NGC 4637 close to M 60 (in the eVs' FoV)
NGC 4647 See M 60 and M 59 Virgo G       Spiral galaxy, that interacts with M 60 (in the eVs' FoV); can also be seen together with M 59
NGC 4665   Virgo G       Spiral galaxy
NGC 4697   Virgo G       Small elliptical galaxy
NGC 4725 With NGC 4712 Coma Berenices G       Small spiral galaxy with even smaller optically neighboring galaxy NGC 4712 (spiral galaxy); together with NGC 4747 both form the optical galaxy triplet Holm 468.
NGC 4889 With NGC 4874; belong to the Coma Galaxy Cluster (Abell 1656) Coma Berenice G       Tiny (but in reality a giant...); with NGC 4874; belong to the Coma Galaxy Cluster (Abell 1656)
NGC 5005 with NGC 5033 Canes Venatici G     Oblique spiral galaxy with bright core. Forms a gravitationally weakly coupled pair with NGC 5033.
NGC 5053 with M 53 Coma Berenices GC     Very loose globular star cluster near M 53 (1°); in the Vespera Pro together with M 53 on a photo
NGC 5173 With NGC 5169 and NGC 5198 Canes Venatici G       Elliptical galaxy close to M 51; two more galaxies in the eVs' FoV (NGC 5169 and NGC 5198); the three galaxies belong to the NGC 5198 group.
NGC 5426/27 Arp 271 Virgo G       The spiral galaxies NGC 5426 and NGC 5427 are interacting with one another and form a pair that is called Arp 271.
NGC 5371 + Hickson 68 Canes Venatici GN       Spiral galaxy and galaxy group Hickson 68; small, but found both!
NGC 5466   Bootes GC       Rather loose globular star cluster
NGC 5634   Virgo GC       The only globular star cluster in the constellation Virgo; small in the eVs
NGC 5897   Libra GC       Extremely loose structure, only a very low star density even at the center
NGC 5907 Splinter Galaxy Draco G       Can be seen edge-on; in contrast to other "edge-on" galaxies, the ends are not pointed.
NGC 5981/82/85 Draco Triplet Draco G       The galaxies NGC 5981 (spiral), NGC 5982 (elliptical), and NGC 5985 (spiral) form the Draco triplet.
NGC 6041 Abell 2151, Hercules Cluster Hercules G, GaC       Cluster of galaxies 500 million light-years away with 300 galaxies; visible galaxies are tiny in the eVs.
NGC 6207   Hercules G       Small but nice galaxy close to M 13 in Hercules
NGC 6210 Turtle Nebula Hercules PN       Rather bright and turquoise; has a white central star, which is regarded as easy to observe (not in eVs).
NGC 6229   Hercules GC     Small
NGC 6235   Ophiuchus GC       Rather small and little compressed
NGC 6284   Ophiuchus GC       Rather small
NGC 6287   Ophiuchus GC       Small
NGC 6293   Ophiuchus GC       Small, but larger than its neighbors
NGC 6342   Ophiuchus GC       Rather small
NGC 6356   Ophiuchus GC       Small, but larger than its neighbors
NGC 6366   Ophiuchus GC       Rather faint, but fairly large and loose
NGC 6440   Sagittarius GC       Small
NGC 6445   Sagittarius PN       Very small in the eVs
NGC 6517   Ophiuchus GC       Small, has some star chains in its neighborhood
NGC 6535   Serpens GC       Small
NGC 6537 Red Spider Nebula Sagittarius PN       Very small, has a white dwarf at its center
NGC 6539   Serpens GC       Somewhat larger, has some star chains in its neighborhood
NGC 6543 Cat's Eye Nebula Draco PN       Very small in the eVs
NGC 6567   Serpens PN       Very small
NGC 6572 Blue Raquetball Nebula Ophiuchus PN       Small and cyan
NGC 6633   Ophiuchus OC     According to Stoyan on par with M 11 and M 16
NGC 6712   Scutum GC     Somewhat larger and nice
NGC 6741 Phantom Streak Nebula Aquila PN       So extremely small in the eVscope that I was not able to find it on the eVs photo. Neither did the plate solving Website Astrometry.net! But I was able to identify it with the help of Stellarium.
NGC 6751   Aquila PN       Small in the eVs, but can still be identified.
NGC 6781 Snowball Nebula Aquila PN       According to Stoyan, the brightest of four fainter planetary nebulae in this constellation; reminds me of the Ring and the Dumbell nebulae
NGC 6818 Little Gem Nebula Sagittarius PN       According to Stoyan very small and bright, a small turquoise dot in the eVs
NGC 6820/23   Vulpecula GNE/OC       NGC 6820 is a small reflection nebula near the open star cluster NGC 6823. Both are embedded in the large faint emission nebula Sh 2-86. The whole area of nebulosity is often referred to as NGC 6820.
NGC 6822 Barnards Galaxie Sagittarius G       According to Stoyan faint and hard to see. This was in fact even with the eVscope the case. But once, I was able to find a faint glow after post-processing...
NGC 6826 Blinking Planetary Nebula Cygnus PN       According to Stoyan brighter than the Ring Nebula M 57, but not so easy to observe. In the eVs it is just a blue dot...
NGC 6835   Sagittarius G       Very small and seen edge-on; some sources classify it as a barred spiral.
NGC 6882/5   Vulpecula OC       Wide-spread star cluster, actually NGC 6885, not NGC 6882...
NGC 6888 Crescent Nebula Cygnus GNE   Faint
NGC 6934   Delphinus GC     According to Stoyan hard to resolve; it is, however, possible with the eVs.
NGC 6939   Cepheus OC       Together in Vsp's FoV with NGC 6946
NGC 6946 Fireworks Galaxy Cepheus G     Face-on galaxy; 40' distant from the open star cluster NGC 6939, too far away to see both in the eVscope at once. Vsp: Can be observed together with NGC 6939
NGC 6960 Western Veil Nebula Cygnus GN/SR   I was able to catch at least a glimpse of NGC 6960 with the eVs, although all this is far too large for the eVs' FoV. Together with NGC 6992/5 a supernova remnant.
NGC 6992/5 Eastern Veil Nebula Cygnus GN/SR   I was able to catch at least a glimpse of NGC 6992/5 with the eVs, although all this is far too large for the eVs' FoV. Together with NGC 6960 a supernova remnant.
NGC 7000 North America Nebula Cygnus GN   Too large for the eVs(2), nebula not really recognizable; but in the Vsp (mosaic)
NGC 7006   Delphinus GC       Small, but also far away for a globular star cluster
NGC 7009 Saturn Nebula Aquarius PN       Very small, reminds of the planet Saturn with its "ears" (the "ears" are jet streams).
NGC 7023 Iris Nebula Cepheus GN   NGC 7023 is the name of an open star cluster containing the Iris Nebula. The Iris Nebula is a reflection nebula illuminated by a central star.
NGC 7243   Lacerta OC       Originally confirmed with a Karkoschka photo; better seen in August 2020
NGC 7293 Helix Nebula (Eye of God) Aquarius PN   Extremely faint and barely detectable under the initial sky conditions; a little bit better later...
NGC 7317 Stephan's Quintet Pegasus G   Part of Stephan's Quintet, a group of small galaxies. In the eVs it is very small. The quintet is located close to the galaxy NGC 7331.
NGC 7331 With NGC 7335, NGC 7336, NGC 7337, and NGC 7340 Pegasus G   Originally faint, but confirmed with a Stoyan drawing; better seen in August and September 2020; the galaxy NGC 7335 and three smaller galaxies can be seen on the better photos.
NGC 7332/39   Pegasus G       Double galaxy
NGC 7380 Wizard Nebula / Cluster Cepheus GN/OC     A star formation region that contains the young open star cluster NGC 7380.
NGC 7479 Superman Galaxy Pegasus G       Can be seen well as a barred spiral
NGC 7600   Aquarius G       Elliptical galaxy, close to the ecliptic
NGC 7635 Bubble Nebula Cassiopeia GN   Nice, is located close to the well-known open star cluster M 52.
NGC 7640   Andromeda G       Faint
NGC 7662 Blue Snowball Nebula Andromeda PN       According to Stoyan, one of the most beautiful planetary nebulae in the autumn sky, which appears in the small telescope as an even blue disc. In the eVs it appears as a prominent but small blue spot.
NGC 7721   Aquarius G       Spiral galaxy, close to the ecliptic
NGC 7742   Pegasus G       Spiral galaxy, small, but has a very active core.
NGC 7789 Caroline's Rose Cluster, White Rose Cluster Cassiopeia OC     Large; according to Stoyan one of the richest star clusters for small telescopes.
NGC 7814   Pegasus G       Spiral galaxy, seen edge-on
Albireo   Cygnus DS       Hard to recognize as a double star in the eVs
Jupiter     P     If I want to see moons, I cannot see the stripes - and vice versa...
Mars     P     A small orange-yellow disk
Neptune     P      

Small and bluish

Pluto     P       Too close to Jupiter, hard to detect
Saturn     P     Small, but the ring can be recognized
Uranus     P       Small, saw even two moons...
Venus     P       Seen with EV planet mode; indication of a crescent (no round disk)
Moon     M   The moon does not quite fit the eVs' FOV (but the eVs2's, the Vsp's, and the Vsp Pro's)
Sun     S       The sun does not quite fit the eVs' FOV (but the eVs2's, the Vsp's, and the Vsp Pro's)

G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GN = galactic nebula, GE = galactic emission nebula, GR = galactic reflection nebula, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, PN = planetary nebula, SP = star pattern, SC = star cloud, SR = supernova remnant, HII = HII region (emission nebula in other galaxies), P = planet, M = moon

 

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made by walodesign on a mac!
10.06.2024