Messier 110 List

List | References

In the following, I reveal for the list of the 110 Messier objects (according to the Messier Guide from the Oculum publishing house), to what extent I have already photographed them with electronic telescopes or with astro cameras. Visual observations are not taken into account.

See also: Herschel 100+10 List - Overview Astronomy

 

List

Clik the "Object" links to see photos and get some information.

Note: Except for corrections, the eVscope and eVscope 2 columns are closed.

Object Name Constellation Type eVscope eVscope 2 Vespera Cameras Comments
M 1 Crab Nebula Taurus GE AI Supernova remnant from 1054
M 2 Aquarius GC   One of the larger GC
M 3 Canes Venatici GC     One of the larger GC
M 4 Scorpius GC     One of the larger GC; down south and thus, hard to observe
M 5 Serpens Caput GC     One of the larger GC
M 6 Scorpius OC     Forms a cluster duo with M 7, but not in the eVscope...
M 7 Scorpius OC     Forms a cluster duo with M 6, but not in the eVscope...
M 8 Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius OC+GN     Emission nebula (NGC 6523) and open star cluster (NGC 6530)
M 9 Ophiuchus GC     Small globular star cluster
M 10 Ophiuchus GC     Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 12
M 11 Wild Ducks Cluster Scutum OC 224 Is located in the Scutum cloud, a special section of the Milky Way; therefore the photos are full of stars.
M 12 Ophiuchus GC     Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 10
M 13 Hercules Cluster Hercules GC 224 One of the largest GC
M 14 Ophiuchus GC     The third of the three bright globular star clusters in Ophiuchus, but different in character from M 10 und M 12
M 15 Pegasus GC AI Supposedly, it is the best globular cluster in autumn, bright core
M 16 Eagle Nebula Serpens OC+GN 224 Star cluster M 16 embedded in the Eagle Nebula IC 4703
M 17 Omega or Swan Nebula Sagittarius GE 224 One of the most beautiful emission nebulae; in the reversing telescope, some people recognize a swan...
M 18 Sagittarius OC     More a less a "sub par" star cluster
M 19 Ophiuchus GC     Famous for its oval shape
M 20 Trifid Nebula Sagittarius GE     224 Is called Trifid Nebula because it consists of three parts.
M 21 Sagittarius OC     Open star cluster that is given little attention
M 22 Sagittarius GC     One of the largest GC
M 23 Sagittarius OC     Large open star cluster (nearly moon size)
M 24 Small Sagittarius Cloud Sagittarius SC     Part of the Milky Way, too large for the eVscope
M 25 Sagittarius OC     More of a "classical object for binoculars"
M 26 Scutum OC     One of the more inconspicuous star clusters
M 27 Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula PN AI, 224 One of the most beautiful nebulae for me
M 28 Sagittarius GC     Smaller than the nearby M 22
M 29 Cygnus OC   Pattern created from only a few stars
M 30 Capricornus GC   According to Stoyan, a typical globular star cluster that cannot be resolved in small telescopes. In the eVscope this is manifested by the very bright core.
M 31 Andromeda Galaxy Andromeda G AI Too large for the eVscope's field of view
M 32 Comp. of Andromeda G. Andromeda G AI Can be observed in the Vespera together with M 31, not well in the eVscope
M 33 Triangulum Galaxy Triangulum G Very faint, details recognizable only after longer exposures
M 34 Perseus OC   Large and nice open star cluster, reminds me of M 41
M 35 Gemini OC AI Large and nice open star cluster; with AI and Vespera also together with NGC 2518
M 36 Auriga OC AI Nice open star cluster, smaller than M 35
M 37 Auriga OC AI Nice, very dense open star cluster
M 38 Auriga OC AI Nice open star cluster, larger than M 36, not as dense as M 37
M 39 Cygnus OC     Few stars
M 40 Ursa Major DS     Optical double star; nearby are three small galaxies (NGC 4284, NGC 4290, PGC 39934)
M 41 Canis Major OC   Large and nice open star cluster, reminds me of M 34; not as dense as M 35-38
M 42 Orion Nebula Orion GE AI, 224 Too large, somewhat blurry, Trapezium mostly washed out in eVs(2)
M 43 De Mairan's Nebula Orion GN AI, 224 Part of M 42 (the "head")
M 44 Praesepe/Crib Cancer OC     294 Too large for the eVs, a few bright stars
M 45 Pleiades Taurus OC AI Too large for the eVs FoV; Vsp: as a mosaic
M 46 Puppis OC   Large; NGC 2438 (PN) on the photo! Vsp: M 46 and M 47 in the same FoV (mosaic)
M 47 Puppis OC   Large, contains some large bright stars; Vsp: M 47 and M 46 in the same FoV (mosaic)
M 48 Hydra OC     Large, many bright stars, at the center many nearby stars...
M 49 Virgo G     Elliptical galaxy
M 50 Monoceros OC AI Nice large open star cluster with many fine and some bright stars
M 51 Whirlpool Galaxy Canes Venatici G AI, 224, 294 Nice spiral galaxy with connected satellite galaxy NGC 5195
M 52 Cassiopeia OC   Medium-sized open star cluster
M 53 Coma Berenices GC     One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 54 Sagittarius GC     The left one of the three globular star clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69. According to Stoyan, it is not a globular star cluster of our galaxy, but belongs to a dwarf galaxy, which is just being "cannibalized" by our galaxy.
M 55 Sagittarius GC     Larger globular star cluster, very far in the south
M 56 Lyra GC AI One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 57 Ring Nebula Lyra PN AI, 224 Ring clearly visible; tiny with Vsp
M 58 Virgo G   294 Barred spiral galaxy, but hard to see in the eVs
M 59 Virgo G     294 Elliptical galaxy, smaller than M 58; at a distance of 0.4° from M 60 (can be seen together with M 60 with a suitable section)
M 60 Virgo G     294 Elliptical galaxy with satellite NGC 4647 (spiral galaxy); galaxies NGC 4638/37 and IC 809 also on some of the photos (and M 59 with a suitable section)
M 61 Virgo G     Spiral galaxy, small and fine spiral in the eVscope; on May 6, 2020, the new supernova SN 2020jfo within it was discovered.
M 62 Ophiuchus GC     Is located near the horizon, therefore hard to observe
M 63 Sunflower Galaxy Canes Venatici G     Nice, elongated spiral galaxy, somewhat larger
M 64 Blackeye Galaxy Coma Berenices G     Impressive spiral galaxy with unique look, somewhat larger
M 65 Leo G   AI, 224, 294 Thin, elongated spiral galaxy, spiral hard to see; part of the Leo triplet (with M 66 and NGC 3628); with M 66 in the eVs' rectangular FoV; with Vsp the whole triplet can be observed
M 66 Leo G   AI, 224, 294 Elongated spiral galaxy, spiral visible; part of the Leo triplet (with M 65 and NGC 3628); with M 65 in the eVs' rectangular FoV; with Vsp the whole triplet can be observed
M 67 Cancer OC     Large, nice cluster with a few bright stars and many not so bright ones
M 68 Hydra GC  
M 69 Sagittarius GC     Is located farthest to the West of the three globular clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69, small.
M 70 Sagittarius GC     Is located in the middle one of the three globular clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69, small. Up to now, only photographed "disturbed".
M 71 Sagitta GC AI, 224 According to Stoyan, an unusually loose globular star cluster.
M 72 Aquarius GC    

According to Stoyan, one of the more inconspicuous globular star clusters

M 73 Aquarius OC     According to Stoyan, one of the more obscure Messier objects, but worth visiting
M 74 Pisces G   Nice spiral galaxy, but in the eVs(2) small.
M 75 Sagittarius GC     According to Stoyan, following M 54, the farthest away globular star cluster in Messier's catalogue, which explains its low brightness and size.
M 76 Small Dumbbell Nebula Perseus PN   Small, colorful, rectangular
M 77 Cetus G   Spiral galaxy, a bit more to see than with M 74, but in the end just a soft dot in the eVs
M 78 Orion GR AI, 224 Faint, but identifiable using two stars; around new moon, I was able to see more details
M 79 Lepus GC     Smaller globular star cluster
M 80 Scorpius GC     One of the fainter globular cluster, but nevertheless worthwhile; located almost as southernly as M 4.
M 81 Bode Galaxy Ursa Major G AI, 294 Nice spiral galaxy; the spiral is not very conspicuous in the eVs
M 82 Cigar Galaxy Ursa Major G AI, 294 Elongated irregular galaxy (cigar), dirsturbed by an encounter with M 81
M 83 Hydra G  
M 84 Virgo G 294 Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with M 86 in the eVs' FoV (+ NGC 4387 and a bit of NGC 4402); forms together with M 86 and NGC 4387 the "Great Galactic Face" (the latter is best accessed via NGC 4387).
M 85 Coma Berenices G     Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with the galaxy NGC 4394 (barred spiral) in the eVs' FoV; the new supernova 2020nlb (discovered on June 25, 2020) can be seen well.
M 86 Virgo G 294 Observed alone and together with M 84 in the eVs' FoV (+ NGC 4387 and a bit of NGC 4402); forms together with M 84 and NGC 4387 the "Great Galactic Face."
M 87 Virgo G   294 Elliptical galaxy, seen together with NGC 4478 in the eVs' FoV- and in the rectangular format also NGC 4476; has a jet stream; center of the Virgo galaxy cluster
M 88 Coma Berenices G     Spiral galaxy, spiral can be recognized
M 89 Virgo G   294 Elliptical galaxy, a small bright and fuzzy dot...
M 90 Virgo G   294 Spiral galaxy, spiral can be recognized
M 91 Coma Berenices G     Barred spiral galaxy, bar can be recognized, spiral not so much...
M 92 Hercules GC 224 Nice globular star cluster, smaller than M 13, but brighter core
M 93 Puppis OC     Nice open star cluster with compact center
M 94 Canes Venatici G     Small spiral galaxy, the spiral appears more like a nebula
M 95 Leo G 224, 294 Small barred spiral galaxy, relatively faint, but the bar is visible. Forms a pair with M 96, but too far away for the eVs (40').
M 96 Leo G 224, 294 Spiral galaxy, forms a pair with M 95, but too far away for the eVs (40').
M 97 Owl Nebula Ursa Major PN 294 Small green dot with two dark spots; Vsp: Together with M 108 on the same photo
M 98 Coma Berenices G     Spiral galaxy seen edge-on, small bright core
M 99 Coma Berenices G     294 Spiral galaxy, almost seen face-on, similar to M 100 and M 101, but much smaller than M 101
M 100 Coma Berenices G     Spiral galaxy, almost seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 101, but much smaller than M 101; discovered 4-5 more galaxies on a photo!
M 101 Pinwheel Galaxy Ursa Major G   Spiral galaxy, seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 100, but much larger than both; quite impressive in the eVs(2) and Vsp
M 102 Spindle Galaxy Draco G   Seen edge-on; shares the name "Spindle Galaxy" with two other galaxies
M 103 Cassiopeia OC Open star cluster with many fine stars; the brighter stars form a triangle
M 104 Sombrero Galaxy Virgo G     Spiral galaxy, seen nearly edge-on; the dust ring and the bright nucleus led to the name; very impressive in the eVs.
M 105 Leo G AI, 224, 294 Bright elliptical galaxy; can be seen together with the galaxies NGC 3384 (elliptical) and the smaller NGC 3389 (spiral) in the eVs' FoV.
M 106 Canes Venatici G   Larger and bright spiral galaxy with bright core; close to it there is the small spiral galaxy NGC 4248.
M 107 Ophiuchus GC     The faintest of the Messier globular star clusters in constellation Ophiuchus (according to Stoyan)
M 108 Ursa Major G   294 Barred spiral galaxy, nearly seen edge-on; Vsp: can be seen together with M 97
M 109 Ursa Major G     Barred spiral galaxy, the bar is easily recognized in the eVs
M 110 Comp. of Andromeda G. Andromeda G     Satellite galaxy of M 31, very faint...

AI = Atik Infinity, 224 = ZWO ASI224, 294 = ZWO ASI294

 

References

Ronald Stoyan (2020). Messier Guide. Oculum-Verlag (ISBN: 978-3-938469-94-1)
www.oculum-verlag.de/detailview?no=594

 

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