Deep Sky Observations with eVscope July to October 2021

Conditions | Observation Overview | List of Observed Sky Objects | References

Since the end of January 2020, I own an Unistellar eVscope telescope for observing and taking photos of deep sky objects. On this page, I collect information about observations from July to October 2021, which might be of interest to other beginners. In this phase, I used version 1.3. of the Unistellar app, except for the last observations, where I used the newly released app versions 1.4.1, 1.4.2 and 1.4.3. The photos that were taken during this phase are/will be presented elsewhere.

Notes:

 

Conditions

Sky Region and Objects

In July to October 2021, I observed mostly the following sky area (some observed objects are indicated):

Click the map for a larger version - it opens in a new window (Image Courtesy of SkySafari Astronomy, www.simulationcurriculum.com)

Observation Time

The observations in this phase started in mid-July 2021. They typically took place shortly after dusk, when it was sufficiently dark for a successful star alignment. In mid-July, this was after 10:30 p.m.!

Observation Location

Most of the observations took place in Mühlhausen/Kraichgau (Germany):

One observation took place in Sumène (Haute Loire, France) close to Saint Julien-Chapteuil:

The last two observation sessions took place in Erkerode near Braunschweig (Germany):

Equipment Used

When observing with the eVscope, I only needed the eVscope and my iPhones or iPad.

General Conditions

In general, the sky above Mühlhausen/Kraichgau is "light-polluted" (SQM 20.5) and does not invite you to search for deep sky objects. This is certainly one of the reasons why I found some of the deep sky objects that I wanted to observe only sometimes or not at all. For astro photography, however, light pollution is not as disturbing as for visual observations. The sky quality is much better in Sumène (SQM 21.3, I measured 21.1).

 

Observation Overview

Observation Dates

Date
2021
Observed Objects Observed Objects, Details Remarks Further Remarks
Jul 17
MH
OC: M 11
GC: M 5, M 9, M 10, M 12, M 14
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20
G: M 51
Order:
Moon (0 dB, 2.8 and 2 ms)
M 16, M 17, M 51, M 20, M 11, M 14, M 8, M 9, M 10, M 12, M 5

Bathinov mask (checked again later), took a darkframe twice. Observed from about 10:30 p.m. to briefly before 0:30 a.m.. Collimation did not appear optimal (stars often looked like "triangles")...

As far as I remember, no crashes and WiFi aborts (I was on our terrace, as was the eVscope). Used my iPad this time.

Further test with the new app version 1.3 that offers the new large image format (will no longer be mentioned).

Half moon; SQM was 19.85 at the end (00:30 a.m.).

Jul 18
MH
OC: M 11, M 21, M 23, M 24 (SC), M 25, M 26
GC: M 13, M 22, M 28, M 92
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20, NGC 6960
PN: M 27, M 57
G: M 101
Order:
M 16, M 17, M 20, M 16 (better), M 8, M 11, M 25, M 24, M 23, M 21, M 22, M 28, M 26, M 27, M 57, M 13, M 92, M 101, NGC 6960 (Western Veil Nebula)
Collimated my eVscope, although it was only little decollimated. Observed from about 10:30 p.m.to about 01:00 a.m. Despite a proper looking collimation, some stars appeared still like "triangles".

As far as I remember, no crashes and WiFi aborts (I was on our terrace, as was the eVscope). Used my iPad this time, and my wife later her iPhone.

One day after half moon; SQM was 19.8 at the end (00:01 a.m.) - all in all, the sky seemed brighter than on the day before.
Jul 29
Sum
OC: M 11
GC: M 5, M 13
GN: M 16
PN: M 27, M 57
G: M 101
Order:
M 13, M 101, M 81, M 57, M 27, M 5, M 13, M 11, M 16
Focused the eVscope using the Bahtinov mask; observed from 10 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.; operator used iPad (DE), observers used iPhones (FR, EN). Presented only some "highlight" objects...

 

The eVscope would not access M 92 (probably too high in the zenith); did not find M 17 at the end, probably too low on the horizon...

SQM reached 21.1 at the end.

Aug 20
MH
OC: M 11
GC: M 10, M 13, M 92
GN: M 16
PN: M 57
G: M 51, M 101, Abell 2151
Order:
M 11 (for comparison), then collimation & Bahtinov, M 11 (for comparison), M 16, M 13, M 92, M 15 (in clouds), Abell 2151 (NGC 6041) - SQM 18.7 - M 51 - SQM 18.4- M 57, M 10, M 13 - SQM 18.3 - M 101 - SQM 18.35 at ablut midnight
Main goal: Improve the collimation verbessern; M 11served as "before/after" test object; iPhone

Abell 2151 in Hercules was a further target; the remainder was "just for looking".

The sky was bright (almost full moon) and partly cloudy, which made finding some targets difficult. Actually, not a night for observing - and it was not intended for that purpose...

Abell 2151 (with RE 16 04 35, DE 17 43 09 from Mr. Deeg; he used the coordinates of NGC 6041, about center*...).

*) as he stated, but it is more at the bottom...

Aug 25
MH
GC: M 13
PN: M 27, M 57
Order:
M 13, M 57, M 13, M 57, M 27 (in clouds)
A test-wise fight with the clouds; only M 13 seems to be quite good.... (just under SQM 20 in best moments); iPhone 7 Abell 2151 could not be accessed using Mr. Deeg's coordinates (still stored in the iPhone...), the eVscope missed it for two times.
Aug 31
MH
P: Jupiter, Saturn
GC: M 13, M 56, M 92
PN: M 27, M 57
G: Abell 2151, NGC 7317, NGC 7331
Order:
Jupiter, Saturn, Abell 2151 (NGC 6041; 3 locations), M 13, M 92, M 56, M 27, M 57, NGC 7331, NGC 7317 (Stephan's Quintett), Jupiter

Observed from 10:30 p.p. until about 0:35 a.m.; SQM approx. 20.1; iPad

Main goal: repeat Abell 2151; was fairly low at the horizon and in the West

Played around with the exposure for Jupiter (surface or moons...)

Abell 2151 could be accessed using Mr. Deeg's coordinates (newly entered into the iPad)

Sep 8
MH

OS: M 11, M 29
KS: M 3, M 10, M 13, M 14, M 56, M 71, M 92
GN: M 16, M 17
PN: M 27, NGC 6210
G: M 51, M 101, NGC 6207

Order:
M 3, M 13, M 16, M 17, M 27, M 51, M 101, M 92, NGC 6210 (PN), NGC 6207 (galaxy), M 56, M 29, M 11, M 71, M 10, M 14
Observed from 9:30 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. using the new app version 1.4.1; iPad; SQM 20 Despite of SQM 20, the objects appeared relatively faint, and the EV mode often aborted. No idea why - maybe it was due to the new app version (stricter criteria?)...

Partly again a certain fiddling around, until it worked (starting already with the field detection)...

Oct 7
Erk
OC: M 11
GC: M 13
GN: NGC 6960, NGC 6992/5
PN: M 27, M 57
G: M 31, M 33
Order:
M 13
, M 57, M 27, M 31, M 33, M 11, Eastern Veil Nebula (NGC 6992/5), Western Veil Nebula (NGC 6960)
Observed with new app version 1.4.2 from 10:15 p.m. until 11:00 p.m.; iPad, iPhone; SQM 20.5 to 20.7.

 

eVscope focused

Again some technical issues...

Oct 9
Erk
GC: M 13
PN: M 27, M 57
G: M 31, M 33, M 51, NGC 672/IC 1727, NGC 7317, NGC 7331, NGC 7332/7339, NGC 7479
Order:
M 33, NGC 672/IC 1727, NGC 7331, NGC 7332/7339, NGC 7479, NGC 7317, M 31, M 13, M 51, M 27, M 57
Observed with new app version 1.4.2 from 9:08 p.m. until 10:30 p.m.; iPhone; SQM 20.55...20.59, later SQM 20.65...20.61.

 

eVscope focused

Image quality poor despite a dark sky

At the end "presentation" for two Persian girls...

Oct 16
MH
OC: IC 4665, M 11
GC: M 13, M 92
GN: NGC 6960, NGC 6992/5, NGC 7000
PN: M 27, M 57

Order:
M 11
, M 13, M 92, M 57, M 27, M 16, IC 4665, NGC 6992/5, NGC 6960, NGC 7000

Observed with new app version 1.4.2 from 7:45 p.m. until 9:00 p.m.; SQM about 19 (a little more than half moon) eVscope focused

Presentation for a starfriend from nearby, who soon took over as the "operator".

Oct 19
MH
GC: M 13, M 92
PN: M 27, NGC 7293
Order:
M 13, M 92, NGC 7293 (Helix Nebula), Jupiter, Saturn, M 13 (confirm error with manual coordinates), NGC 7293, M 27, NGC 7293, M 27

Observed with new app version 1.4.3 from 7:40 p.m. until 10:30 p.m., SQM about 18.5 (nearly full moon) eVscope focused

Session goals: confirm error with manual coordinates, see user alerts for EV mode aborts, find the Helix Nebula

Oct 23
MH
GC: M 2, M 15, M 30, M 72, M 75, NGC 6934
OC: M 73
GN: IC 5070, IC 5146, NGC 7293
PN: NGC 7009
NGC 7293 (Helix Nebula, 21 min), NGC 7293 (ditto, about 11 min) , M 30, M 75, M 72, M 73, NGC 7009 (Saturn Nebula), M 2, M 15, NGC 6934, IC 5070 (Pelican Nebula), IC 5146 (Cocoon Nebula), Moon Observed with new app version 1.4.3 from 8:45 p.m. until 10:30 p.m., SQM about 19.3 and later 19.2 because of the moon.

eVscope focused

Session goals: find the Helix Nebula, find diverse globular star clusters

Bold: First observation during this observation period; G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GN = galactic nebula, PN = planetary nebula, P = star pattern, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, SN = supernova

 

List of Observed Sky Objects

Object details can be obtained via the links to the relevant deep sky objects.

DSO Details
Name Constellation Type Remarks
IC 4665   Ophiuchus OC Can already be seen with the naked eye as a faint glow; too large to be seen well in the eVscope.
IC 5070 Pelican Nebula Cygnus GNE Large reddish nebula, can be guessed without post-processing...
IC 5146 Cocoon Nebula Cygnus GN Small reddish nebula with embedded open star cluster Cr 470
M 2   Aquarius GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 3   Canes Venatici GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones, smaller than M 5
M 5   Serpens Cauda GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones, larger than M 3
M 8 Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius GN Emission nebula (NGC 6523) and open star cluster (NGC 6530)
M 9   Ophiuchus GC Small globular star cluster
M 10   Ophiuchus GC Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 12, brighter than M 12
M 11 Wild Duck Cluster Scutum OC Is located in the Scutum cloud, a special section of the Milky Way; therefore the photos are full of stars.; therefore the photos are full of stars.
M 12   Ophiuchus GC Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 10
M 13 Hercules Cluster Hercules GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 14   Ophiuchus GC The third of the three bright globular star clusters in Ophiuchus, but different in character from M 10 und M 12.
M 15   Pegasus GC Supposedly, it is the best globular cluster in autumn, briught core.
M 16 Eagle Nebula Serpens GN Star cluster M 16 embedded in the Eagle Nebula IC 4703
M 17 Omega/Swan Nebula Sagittarius GN One of the most beautiful emission nebulae; in the reversing telescope, some people recognize a swan...
M 20 Trifid Nebula Sagittarius GN Is called Trifid Nebula because it consists of three parts.
M 21   Sagittarius OC Open star cluster that is given little attention to...
M 22   Sagittarius GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 23   Sagittarius OC Large open star cluster (nearly moon size)
M 24 Small Sagittarius Cloud Sagittarius SC Part of the Milky Way, too large for the eVscope
M 25   Sagittarius OC A "classical object for binoculars"
M 26   Scutum OC One of the more inconspicuous star clusters
M 27 Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula PN Nice, but sometimes faint or in clouds
M 28   Sagittarius GC Smaller than the nearby M 22
M 29   Aquila OS Pattern created from a few stars
M 30   Capricornus GC According to Stoyan, a typical globular star cluster that cannot be resolved in small telescopes. In the eVscope this is manifested by the very bright core.
M 31 Andromeda Galaxy Andromeda G Too large for the eVscope's field of view
M 33 Triangulum Galaxy Triangulum G Very faint, details recognizable only after longer duration in EV mode
M 51 with NGC 5195 Canes Venatici G Nice spiral galaxy with connected satellite galaxy NGC 5195
M 56   Lyra GC One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 57 Ring Nebula Lyra PN Ring clearly visible
M 71   Sagitta GC According to Stoyan, an unusually loose globular star cluster
M 72   Aquarius GC According to Stoyan, one of the more inconspicuous globular star clusters
M 73   Aquarius OC According to Stoyan, one of the more obscure Messier objects, but worth visiting
M 75   Sagittarius GC According to Stoyan, following M 54, the farthest away globular star cluster in Messier's catalogue, which explains its low brightness and size.
M 92   Hercules GC Nice globular star cluster, smaller than M 13, but brighter core
M 101 Pinwheel Galaxy Ursa Major G Spiral galaxy, seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 100, but much larger than both; quite impressive in the eVscope; this time rather faint
NGC 672 mit IC 1727 Triangulum G Galaxy pair Holm 46
NGC 6041 Abell 2151, Hercules Cluster Hercules G, GaC Cluster of galaxies 500 million light-years away with 300 galaxies; visible galaxies are tiny in the eVscope.
NGC 6207   Hercules G Small galaxy close to M 13 in Hercules; small but nice
NGC 6210 Turtle Nebula Hercules PN Rather bright and turquoise; has a white central star, which is regarded as easy to observe (not in eVscope).
NGC 6934   Delphinus GC According to Stoyan hard to resolve; it is, however, possible with the eVscope.
NGC 6960 Western Veil Nebula Cygnus GN I was able to catch at least a glimpse of NGC 6960 with the eVscope, although all this is far too large for the eVscope's field of view.
NGC 6992/5 Eastern Veil Nebula Cygnus GN I was able to catch at least a glimpse of NGC 6992/5 with the eVscope, although all this is far too large for the eVscopes field of view
NGC 7000 North America Nebula Cygnus GN Too large for the eVscope, nebula not really recognizable...
NGC 7009 Saturn Nebula Aquarius PN Very small, reminds of the planet Saturn with its "ears".
NGC 7293 Helix Nebula (Eye of God) Aquarius PN Extremely faint and barely detectable under the existing sky conditions, a little better later...
NGC 7317 Stephan's Quintet Pegasus G Part of Stephan's Quintet, a group of small galaxies. In the eVscope it is very small. It is located close to the galaxy NGC 7331.
NGC 7331 With NGC 7335, NGC 7337, and NGC 7340 Pegasus G Originally faint, but confirmed with a Stoyan drawing; better seen in August and September 2020; the galaxy NGC 7335 and two smaller galaxies are on the better photos.
NGC 7332/39   Pegasus G Double galaxy
NGC 7479 Superman Galaxy Pegasus G Can be seen well as a barred spiral
Jupiter     P If I want to see moons, I cannot see the stripes - and vice versa... Better with app version 1.4.3.
Saturn     P Small, but the ring can be recognized
Moon     M Close to the full moon

G = galaxy, GaC = galaxy cluster, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GE = galactic emission nebula, GR = galactic reflection nebula, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, PN = planetary nebula, SP = star pattern, HII = HII region (emission nebula in other galaxies)

 

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19.11.2021