Walking the Moon with my own Photos - Moon Landscapes Part 2

Introduction | Large Craters | Craters, Ring Mountains | Vallis | Rupes, Rimae | Other... | References

On these pages I do "moon walks" on the basis of my own photos. In other words, I try to name the objects on my lunar photos to get to know the moon better. Maybe these pages will help others to get to know the moon better as well...

On this and another page, I present landscapes on the moon, surface elements (maria, craters, mountains), or combinations of these. Some of the photos are repeated because they contain several interesting objects. I hope to be able to replace the photos with better ones in the course of time...

See also Moon Landscapes - Part 1 - Back to the overview of my "moon walks".

 

Introduction

On this page and on a second one, I present landscapes on the moon, surface elements (maria, craters, mountains), or combinations of these. The photos are rotated by 180 degrees or mirrored so that they correspond to the normal visual impression, but they are often somewhat skewed.

See also Moon Landscapes - Part 1.

Note: For space reasons, the description of the elements of the moon surface can be found on page Walking the Moon with my own Photos - Overview.

 

Large Craters (Wall Plains)

Wall plains are large craters with diameters between 100 and 300 km. I therefore call them usually craters as well... The wall is usually already decayed or covered by later impacts, and the bottom is flooded with lava.

Plato and Archimedes

The wall plain Plato is 100 km in diameter. The wall plain Archimedes is smaller and has a diameter of about 80 km. On the following photo, Plato was illuminated by the sun on February 23, 2018 (Half Moon at shortly after 9 a.m.).

    

Photo data: February 23, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-102 OTA, Ricoh GR held to the eyepiece

Here are two photos with Plato and Archimedes, where Plato is once again close to the terminator:

    
     
 

Photo data: March 25, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-127 OTA, Sony RX100 M4 attached to the eyepiece

 

Craters, Ring Mountains

Craters, small craters, and ring mountains are distinguished as follows:

Beside showing the wall plains Plato and Archimedes, the the previous two photos also show a number of craters and ring mountains:

There are also a number of unnamed small craters on the photos.

    
     
 

Photo data: March 25, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-127 OTA, Sony RX100 M4 attached to the eyepiece

The following photos show craters and ring mountains that are located further south:

Wall plains are: Alphonsus, Ptolemaeus. For some craters/ring mountains I made a preliminary assignment, because I was not able to find the needed information. Please do not take these assignments too seriously, in case of doubt, these are all craters...

*) In Spix's Moonhopper designated as wall plain.

    
     
 

Photo data: March 25, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-127 OTA, Sony RX100 M4 attached to the eyepiece

The next photos show once again craters and ring mountains that are located further south but are located to the right of the previous one:

Wall plains are: Fracastorius? For some craters/ring mountains I made a preliminary assignment, because I was not able to find the needed information. Please do not take these assignments too seriously. In case of doubt, these are all craters...

    
     
 

Photo data: April 2-3, 2017, Sky-Watcher Explorer 150PDS, Ricoh GR held to the 7 mm UWA eyepiece

 

Vallis (Valleys)

Valleys (lat. Vallis) are divided into three types according to their different history:

Vallis Alpes

The Vallis Alpes is a collapse valley.

    
     
 

Photo data: March 24, 2018, Sky-Watcher Explorer 150PDS, Ricoh GR held to the eyepiece

    
     
 

Photo data: March 25, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-127 OTA, Sony RX100 M4 attached to the eyepiece

 

Rupes, Rimae (Grooves, ...)

Rupes are either terraces as a result of subsidence in the marginal zones of the seas or remains of ring mountains or crater segments.

Rupes Altai

The Rupes Altai are terraces as a result of subsidence in the marginal zones of Mare Nectaris.

    

And here the Rupes Altai once more with some surround:

    

At the top center you see the craters Catharina, Cyrillus, and Theophilus (from left to right), in the middle the Mare Nectaris, and at the left from top to bottom the terrrace Rupes Altai in the light of the rising sun.

Photo data: March 24, 2018 (Half Moon), Sky-Watcher Eyplorer 150PDS, Ricoh GR held to the eyepiece.

Rupes Recta (Straight Wall)

Rupes Recta is a linear fault on the moon, in the southeastern part of the Mare Nubium. It can already be clearly seen in small telescopes in the grazing light of the Half Moon thanks to its shadow cast.

    
     
 

Photo data: March 25, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-127 OTA, Sony RX100 M4 attached to the 32 mm-DigiScope eyepiece.

Rima Hyginus

The Rima Hyginus (Hyginus Rille) with crater Hyginus (11 km in diameter) at the center was a little bit harder to find for me... Further rillae in that area are not visible on my photos, except for, with a very good will, Rima Ariadaeus...

    

Photo data: March 25, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-127 OTA, Sony RX100 M4 attached to the eyepiece

 

Other...

Rays

The following two sections show the southern part of the moon. The photos were taken on February 27-28, 2018 with different cameras and methods. Most prominent is the crater Tycho with rays emanating from it.

    
 
 

Photo data: February 27, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-102 telescope, Ricoh GR held to the eyepiece

 

Photo data: February 28, 2018, Sky-Watcher Skymax-102 telescope, Leica X Vario attached to the 32 mm eyepiece

 

References

 

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01.04.2018